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It's cold outside, innit?

Bleddy hell, it is proper cold, and I aint even got no gloves! It’s deffo colder whether than it’s ment to be!


As a spelling/grammar-obsessed editor, I have to sit on my hands when I’m browsing through social media and try very hard not to correct people’s mistakes. Let’s face it, no-one is perfect, and on social media this is more apparent than anywhere else. I’ll have a rant about spellings another time, but I have to address the colloquialisms when it comes to the literary written word.


What are colloquialisms?


They are local dialects, regional speech basically. I will give you some examples of colloquials I have read either on social media or manuscripts.


‘Innit’ – isn’t it. Yes, I hold my hand up, this is one of my top faults. From the East Midlands, I’m not sure if this is just restricted to my area or more widespread. Other words that mean the same thing include ‘aint it’, ‘ainit’ or ‘ennit’. Verbally it is fine (try to avoid using in interviews of in front of the queen!).


‘Should of’ / ‘could of’ – should have / could have. I’m not quite sure where this comes from, but get the backs up of several people I know!


‘Council’ – cancel. You wouldn’t believe it possible to get this wrong, but I have found this amongst people in Kent as well as the East Midlands (Derby in particular), but never noticed it when I lived in Leicester. Cancel is when you have to stop plans or events/activities, council is a district or area authority eg Leicester City COUNCIL, Derby City COUNCIL, Ashford Borough COUNCIL etc etc.


‘Off of’ – off. I think this may be the northern end of England as I don’t remember hearing it in my 10 years in Kent. I have heard it in the East Midlands so from there upwards possibly. What they are usually saying, or writing, is things like, “She got off of the sofa,” when it should just be, “She got off the sofa,” or even, “She stood up and moved away from the sofa,” and similar.


‘There aint no’ – there isn’t any. This and many other double negatives, like ‘I haven’t got none’, are no good! Two negatives don’t make a positive.


So in a nutshell, think before you type, ya wanna mek sure ya writin it proper, an not the way ya speak!